Meet Our 2018 Speakers
 
Dr. Azizah Y. al-Hibri - Keynote Speaker
Dr. Azizah Y. al-Hibri is Professor Emerita at the T. C. Williams School of Law, University of Richmond, where she taught for twenty years. She is the first Muslim woman to become tenured in an American law school.   She is also a former professor of Philosophy, Founding Editor of Hypatia: a Journal of Feminist Philosophy, and Founder of Karamah: Muslim Women Lawyers for Human Rights).  Dr. al-Hibri was a presidential appointee to the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (2011-13), a Library of Congress Scholar‑in‑Residence, a Fulbright scholar and National Humanities Center scholar (2000‑2001).  In June, 2016, Dr. al-Hibri became the first American Muslim woman to be invited by His Majesty the King of Morocco, Muhammad VI, to deliver a Dars Hassani (religious lecture) at his palace, attended by Muslim scholars, official, and diplomats.  As a champion of religious rights, she joined in January, 2016, other world leaders in signing the Marrakesh Declaration, which called for the protection of the religious rights of non-Muslim minorities in Muslim countries.  She has also participated in the “Registration of Marriage” campaign in the United Kingdom that demands the official registration of all marriages, regardless of faith.  For the last three decades, Dr. al-Hibri has written and lectured extensively on issues of Muslim women’s rights, Islam and democracy, human rights in Islam, Islamic interfaith values, and Muslim civil rights in the U.S. Her recent book, The Islamic Worldview (vol. 1, 2014), focuses on basic jurisprudentially issues.  Dr. al-Hibri publishes mostly in law journals and other legal publications.  Dr. al-Hibri has received many awards, including the Virginia First Freedom Award, presented in 2007 by the Council for America’s First Freedom, the Life Time Achievement Award in 2009 from the Journal of Law & Religion, Outstanding Achievement Award, by the ADC Women’s Initiative in 2012.  In January, 1997, Dr. al-Hibri delivered what may have been the first Muslim Invocation at the Virginia State Senate.